Florida Gulf Coast Food, Restaurants and Waterfront Views
Florida Waterfront
Gulf Restaurants
Restaurant
Recipes
Beef
Breakfast
Chicken
Desserts
Fish
Pork
Sauces
Shellfish
Soups

Neat Places
to Visit

Tin City - Naples

Fisherman's Village - Punta Gorda

Clearwater Marine Aquarium  - Clearwater

John's Pass - Treasure Island
*An asterick beside the restaurant name indicates the editor or staff have visited the restaurant. The review is on the restaurant's listing.

Apalachicola
Papa Joe's Oyster House*

Cedar Key
Seabreeze on the Dock

Clearwater Beach
Backwaters on Sand Key*
Maggie Mae's*
Palm Pavilion*

Ft. Myers Beach
Matanza's Inn*

Key West
A&B Lobster House*
Schooner Wharf*

Islamorada
Bentley's*

Naples
Riverwalk at Tin City*

Panacea
Posey's Dockside Cafe*

Pine Island
Bert's*
Ragged Ass Saloon*

Punta Gorda
Harpoon Harry's*

Sarasota
Marina Jack's*

Steinhatchee
Roy's Restaurant*

Stock Island
Hogfish Grill*

Tarpon Springs
Rusty Bellies*

Treasure Island
Sculley's*
Hotels and Great
Places to Stay
Waterfront places to stay are marked with an asterick*.

Apalachicola - The Gibson Inn

Ft Myers Beach - Matanza's Inn*

Islamorada - Holiday Isle Resort*

Key West - Curry Mansion

Naples - Cove Inn*

Florida Gulf Coast Food, Restaurants and Waterfront Views

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It is generally accepted that Florida was discovered in 1513 by Ponce de Leon. He promptly claimed what he thought was an island for Spain. While the eastern part of Florida was land the English and Spanish clashed over through the early 1700's, western Florida became clusters of settlements far removed from from the influences of conflicts along the east coast. The United States "annexed" western Florida in 1810. In 1821 Spain sells and cedes all claims to Florida and the state becomes the 27th state of the United States in 1845.

During Florida's first 300 plus years, the west coast, along the Gulf of Mexico, became clusters of cultures as diverse as the food and ethnic backgrounds of the people who lived there. From pirates, native Americans, pursued slaves, French settlers, Spanish settlers, Cuban settlers and religious colonies the Gulf coast became, arguably, the most interesting stretch of shoreline in the country - and it still is!